Showing Mon Nov 26 - Sun Dec 23, 2018

2017 Series

Monday, November 26, 2018: Psalms 82-83

Both psalms include a call to God for justice and action. This is the work Christ does for us through His death and resurrection. For whose justice and action in the Name of the Lord Jesus Christ do you need to intercede as you consider today’s world? How does this inform your Advent praying, watching and working?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Tuesday, November 27, 2018: 2 Kings 1-2

Disobedience to the Lord can be caused by and further aggravates deafness to the Lord. Elijah heard the Lord and did what He said and was eventually taken up to heaven. Through Jesus’ obedience, we are given new life. In what areas of your life do you need to become obedient to God? Are there areas in your life in which you are deaf to His will?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Wednesday, November 28, 2018: 2 Kings 3-4

The Shunammite woman was awaiting death. Perhaps you or others you know are as well during this season of Advent, especially as you consider a present predicament. Elisha, however, was awaiting life and, as a result, became a vehicle to bring life to the Shunammite woman’s son. Are you awaiting resurrection in the season of Advent? If not, how could you start?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Thursday, November 29, 2018: 2 Kings 5-6

Perhaps it was not only Naaman’s leprosy that kept him from believing God’s servant, Elisha. Sometimes God’s servants are hard to believe. What are God’s servants saying today in the Name of Christ that may be hard for you to believe? Might that be preventing you or others from experiencing the healing Christ purchased for us in His suffering, death and resurrection? Could it be time for you to return to the waters to “wash and be clean?”

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Friday, November 30, 2018: 2 Kings 7-8

Different kings are described in these chapters. In the season of Advent, we are awaiting the return of Christ the King. How does Christ the King compare to the kings in these chapters? What does that say about your view of earthly rulers versus Christ the King?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Saturday, December 1, 2018: 2 Kings 9-10

Jehu slew many evil people in his time. Yet, he was not careful to walk in the law of the Lord, bringing telling results. Had he completed the work he was given to do, perhaps things could have been different. Christ the King completed the work He had as He said, “It is finished,” from His holy cross. What unfinished work faces you this Advent? How will you glorify God by getting that work done as He commanded you?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Monday, December 3, 2018: 2 Kings 11-12

Joash did what was right in the eyes of the Lord (2 Kings 12:2) but the high places were not taken away and the people continued to make offerings there (2 Kings 12:3). As Advent is a season of “now/not yet,” what paradoxes do you observe in the work of faithful saints today? What can you do about rectifying such inconsistencies for the sake of the Gospel’s proclamation as a testimony to Christ’s atoning work for us?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Tuesday, December 4, 2018: 2 Kings 13, 2 Chronicles 24

In the exchange of Elisha and Joash, arrows become parabolic concerning victory and defeat. As the late Rev. Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. reminds, we are challenged to consider “What’s in your hand?” when we consider victory and defeat in the Name of the Lord. What is being asked of you to do prophetically that could bring victory for the sake of those around you this Advent? Might you need to be more persistent (2 Kings 13:19) with what our Lord has given you?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Wednesday, December 5, 2018: 2 Kings 14, 2 Chronicles 25

Amaziah’s idolatry brought misfortune and defeat, even though he had been given many victories.

The First Commandment our Lord gave His people on Mount Sinai deals with idolatry. Thankfully, Jesus kept this commandment for us and calls us through the waters of baptism to do the same. What is the idolatry you face this Advent? As the candles burn on the wreath, what can you do to repent and return to the Lord before defeat comes?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Thursday, December 6, 2018: Jonah 1-2

Jonah thought that he could flee from the presence of the Lord (1:3). As he does, the Lord sends a fish to rescue him and “project” him to the shore. Thankfully, Jesus boldly followed the will of His Father, even as it took Him to His death. Are you shying away from what our Lord has given you to do this Advent? What people, like those in Nineveh, may be counting on you to be obedient? Do you pray for them or care about them?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Friday, December 7, 2018: Jonah 3-4

Jonah’s sermon was short but the results were phenomenal. Jonah was displeased, though, by Nineveh’s repentance. “Do you do well to be angry,” the Lord said to him (4:4). What about your anger at the way things unfold in your life—do you do well to be angry? Are you more concerned about trees that cover your bald head than you are about “that great city” (4:11) and the many people who do not know their right hand from their left all around you?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Saturday, December 8, 2018: 2 Kings 15, 2 Chron. 26

Pride gets us in the end. It happened to Uzziah that way as he died a leper since he decided to take over responsibilities in the temple that were not given to him. As the season of Advent progresses, how may you repent of the pride in your life, especially as it affects the work our Lord has given you to do in your parish? Do you realize that your pride may get you thrown out (2 Chronicles 26:21)? Since Jesus died and rose again to atone for your pride and He gives you access to the throne of grace, how might Advent be a time to prepare yourself to do only what our Lord has given you to do?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Monday, December 10, 2018: Isaiah 1-2

“O house of Jacob, come, let us walk in the light of the Lord” (Isaiah 2:5). As the Advent wreath grows even brighter, how do the warnings in these chapters call you to repentance as we prepare to celebrate the return of Christ—the Day of the Lord? As you consider the glad tidings of 2:1-5, how do these images inform worship life in your parish?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Tuesday, December 11, 2018: Isaiah 3-4

The Lord’s judgment of Judah and Jerusalem in Isaiah 3 offers images that are contrary to what we may often hear (v. 1, 7, 13, 17, etc.). Chapter 4 shows how the branch of the Lord is glorified. These are both works of Christ. How do you hear the severity of the Lord’s Law? How do you hear the sweetness of the Gospel? Can you see both as God’s work today?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Wednesday, December 12, 2018: Isaiah 5-6

The Song of the Vineyard in Isaiah 5, relates the tragic consequences of rejecting God’s grace and mercy. The season of Advent is an invitation to come, receive and welcome the love of our Lord and Savior. After beholding the glory of the Lord (described in chapter 5), Isaiah is cleansed of his sin and equipped to carry God’s message to the people. Are you open to God’s cleansing and equipping grace?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Thursday, December 13, 2018: Isaiah 7-8

Isaiah 8:17 is a verse to memorize this Advent. First, see it in the context of these chapters. Next, see it operable in the life and work of Christ. Then, see it applied to the life of the saints throughout history. Finally, see how it applies to your life as the Lord is the one who is to be honored as holy, feared and dreaded (8:13). How might the Lord be hiding His face this Advent as you hope in Him?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Friday, December 14, 2018: Amos 1-2

It is easy to think that the judgment of God is for our neighbors (1:2-2:3). Yet, the judgment of God is on those who should know better as well (2:4-16). The shepherd farmer Amos denounces the proud people of God who broke the covenant. What prophetic words is the Lord offering the Church today? What prophetic words is He bringing to your parish and family, even as the earthquake may be two years away (1:1). How may you flee to Christ to avoid destruction this Advent?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Saturday, December 15, 2018: Amos 3-4

“You only have I known of all the families of the earth; therefore, I will punish you for all your iniquities” (3:2). That is exactly what happens as our Lord Jesus suffers and dies on the cross for us. Our disobedience and refusal to return to the Lord brought destruction on the ever-righteous Christ. How do these chapters help you appreciate all the more that “Christ was born for this,” and “Christ was born to save” in this season of Advent?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Monday, December 17, 2018: Amos 5-6

“Seek the Lord and live” (5:6) to let “justice roll down like waters and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream” (5:24). As it is “an evil time” (5:13), we are called to “seek good and not evil” so that we may live. This is only possible through Christ Jesus who works through the Means of the Spirit to bring us to God. How might “ease in Zion” (6:1) keep you from seeking the Lord as He wants you to seek Him? Is your complacency preventing you from appreciating the richness of the Advent drama in which we live and the narrative of our salvation that you think you know so well?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Tuesday, December 18, 2018: Amos 7-8

Amos 8:10 does not describe what most people’s “holiday parties” should look like. Perhaps it is because people wait too long to “run to and fro, seeking the word of the Lord,” but not finding it (8:12). Might the Lord be taking you as you are—just like he did with Amos (7:14-15)—to share His message with those around you? Remember that your credentials are in your baptism into Christ.

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Wednesday, December 19, 2018: Amos 9, 2 Chronicles 27

The final verses of Amos present a picture of what the Lord promises to do for His people. As the Advent wreath burns brightly, how can you hold up these images to those around you when they ask for Christmas presents? How can you remind people that we did not get what we deserved (Amos 9:1-10) but have been given rich blessings in Christ (Amos 9:11ff)?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Thursday, December 20, 2018: Isaiah 9-10

Isaiah 9:1-7 present multiple promises that come to us through the birth, death, resurrection and return of Christ Jesus our Lord. Arrogance and oppression are defeated as the remnant of the Lord returns (Isaiah 10). In the busyness of these final days of Advent, how can you see the Lord taking away the burden from your shoulder (10:27) in order to take it on Himself (9:6)? How can you cast your burdens on the Lord and rejoice in your deliverance this Advent as you prepare for the celebration of our Lord’s holy nativity?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Friday, December 21, 2018: Isaiah 11-12

The shoot from Jesse who is the righteous branch shall reign with understanding, counsel, might, knowledge and the fear of the Lord as He judges the poor and cares for the meek. As righteousness and faithfulness are His belt, how can you begin singing the salvation song of God today (Isaiah 12) in anticipation of that which is still coming to us? How can the conclusion of the Advent season keep you in “Advent expectancy” of our Lord’s saving work in your life and in His Church?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)


Saturday, December 22, 2018: Micah 1-2

As the Eve of the Nativity of our Lord Jesus Christ gives us opportunity to thank our Lord for His coming among us, that coming brings destruction to those who are His enemies and salvation to His faithful ones. This can cause even Micah to lament and walk, going stripped and naked (1:8) just as Jesus did on His way to the holy cross. Thankfully, as the incurable wound (1:9) is received in Jesus’ body on our behalf, how may you give thanks tonight and tomorrow for the conqueror (1:15) who comes among us to defeat your sin for you?

—Dien Taylor (Redeemer, Bronx)