Showing Mon Dec 24 - Sun Jan 20, 2019

2017 Series

Monday, December 24, 2018: Micah 3-4

Week 61 Theme: Restoration through Jesus Christ

Micah the Prophet speaks about judgment for all who abuse their authority as well as the final restoration of peace. How does this reflect the promise of the Messiah? Does Micah’s words set the stage for the Reformation? If so, how?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Tuesday, December 25, 2018: Micah 5-6

What images and titles of Jesus Christ are mentioned in this section of Micah?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Wednesday, December 26, 2018: Micah 7, 2 Chronicles 28

The birth of Christ was the fulfillment of God’s promise to Adam and Eve [Gen 3]. How does Micah reflect this accomplishment? What role does repentance play in our lives? How does David’s charge to Solomon [I Chronicles] instruct us in our daily lives as Christians?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Thursday, December 27, 2018: 2 Kings 16-17

Because of Christ, St Peter declared, believers have become a holy nation [I Peter 2:9]. Remembering this throughout the next several week’s study – comparing the Church to Israel and Judah – how is God’s judgment imposed on all who reject Him, both in ancient times and today?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Friday, December 28, 2018: Isaiah 13-14

The struggles of ancient Israel prophesy of our own. God promised justice then and now. How is this justice served for ancient Israel? Does it apply to the Church? To us as individual believers?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Saturday, December 29, 2018: Isaiah 15-16

The prophet speaks of further judgment, this time against Moab. Who might Moab be – then and now [think 16th Century]. After such a long history, what was Moab’s undoing? From where should Moab’s restoration and strength come?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Monday, December 31, 2018: Isaiah 17-18

Week 62 Theme: Babylon is often used as a metaphor for any estrangement from God. Luther wrote of the Babylonian captivity of the Church at the time of the Reformation. Are there any possible parallels between the biblical texts and the Church in the 16th Century, and today?

God declares judgment against all opponents of Israel [used today as a metaphor for the Church]. And yet, there is always hope in the words of Gospel. How does Isaiah express this distinction between Law and Gospel?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Tuesday, January 1, 2019: Isaiah 19-20

At His ascension, Jesus declared that His Gospel would spread from Jerusalem to throughout Samaria and Judea, and to the ends of the earth [Acts 1:7]. How does Isaiah present this? Is this redemption guaranteed, or can it be lost?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Wednesday, January 2, 2019: Isaiah 21-22

A characteristic of “Babylon” is disobedience to the Lord’s precepts. Even God’s own people act as if living in Babylon. When that occurs, does God’s people – Jerusalem – deserve the same punishment as Babylon does? Is there relief and Gospel in these chapters? Who is Eliakim?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Thursday, January 3, 2019: Isaiah 23-24

Just days ago, we celebrated the birth of Christ, beginning our anticipation of the salvation to be won for us at Calvary. How does Isaiah prophesy these words of Law and Gospel? How does the New Testament confirm this [Book of Revelation].

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Friday, January 4, 2019: Isaiah 25-26

The doom and destruction of fallen Creation is not the end. The judgment of the Law is tempered with Gospel, particularly in the prophesy of Christ’s birth. Are we in this picture?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Saturday, January 5, 2019: Isaiah 27, 2 Kings 18:1-8

Eden is the idyllic place where the relationship between Creator and creature was pure, holy and personal. Israel has strayed far from that place, as might also be said for the Church prior to the Reformation. In these passages, who is Hezekiah and why is he important to the history of the Church?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Monday, January 7, 2019: 2 Chronicles 29-30

Week 63 Theme: The Promise of Restoration

After the rule of evil kings, concluding with Ahaz, the relationship between God and Judah appears irreconcilably broken. Yet, there is restoration through the work of Hezekiah. The temple is restored, as is worship and the observance of the Law. Of these, which foretell of the coming of the Messiah? Is true worship ever restored? How? When?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Tuesday, January 8, 2019: 2 Chronicles 31, Psalm 48

The psalmist praises God for His steadfastness and deliverance. Is this evident in the outcome of the Assyrian attack upon Judah. Is this evident in the Church as well as our daily lives? How does the psalmist describe God as a mighty fortress?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Wednesday, January 9, 2019: Hosea 1-2

God looks for faithfulness in His people. In the opening chapters of Hosea, the writer uses the imagery of a prostitute to point out the faithlessness of His people. How is this apparent? What is the significance of Hosea’s children’s’ names?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Thursday, January 10, 2019: Hosea 3-4

However, despite this faithlessness and all it breeds, God is faithful and allows Hosea to “redeem” his bride. How does this reflect the intent of the Lutheran reformers, both during Luther’s times and afterwards?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Friday, January 11, 2019: Hosea 5-6

Once again, God’s judgment upon Israel and Judah is recalled. What differences, if any, are there between this account and the others already read? Remember: Hosea is writing at the same time as was II Chronicles – before and during Hezekiah’s reign.

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Saturday, January 12, 2019: Hosea 7-8

Jesus came to restore Israel, a metaphor for the Church. Hosea has warned of being unfaithful [adultery], but the sins of Israel go beyond that. What restoration was needed in Israel that Christ came to bring? How is Christ’s intended restoration of Israel reflected in the Reformation?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Monday, January 14, 2019: Hosea 9-10

Week 64 Theme: The Restoration of Righteousness

The imagery of Hosea continues with Israel being compared to a productive vine enjoying the benefits of bearing much fruit. Yet, Israel does not express thankfulness for its blessings. Do we? What has happened to us, and the Church, when we have concentrated more on what has been accomplished by us rather than by Christ?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Tuesday, January 15, 2019: Hosea 11-12

God’s love for Israel and Judah knows no bounds. How does this reflect Christ’s love for us? The response to this love should be to return it in kind, as humanly possible. Is that what thre ancient did? Do we? How has that been an expression of our faith, and to what extent does God go to restore such faith in His people?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Wednesday, January 16, 2019: Hosea 13-14

In the final chapters of the book, Hosea calls for a return to the Lord – a Restoration of Righteousness. What promises are made upon that return? Are these only the words of Hosea, or can Luther be found in them as well?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Thursday, January 17, 2019: Isaiah 28-29

The waywardness of Israel brings judgment, and grace. How?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Friday, January 18, 2019: Isaiah 30-31

It would appear that Israel never learns its lesson; it continually breaks God’s Law despite know what the consequences will be. Yet, the lesson goes beyond the need for obedience. It also teaches about listening and learning from God’s Word and by it restoring righteousness.

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)


Saturday, January 19, 2019: Isaiah 32-33

In Isaiah 31, God warns about returning to Egypt, to the days of being exiled from God. Rather, His people are to await a king who will reign in righteousness. How is this King? How do these passages prophesy of Pentecost and the coming of God’s Spirit? Is this the Restoration of Righteousness Luther looked for, and we look forward to today?

—Henry Albrechtsen (Love, East Greenbush)