Showing Mon Jun 12 - Sun Jul 8, 2018

2017 Series

Monday, June 11, 2018: Psalms 124-126

Three of fifteen Psalms of Ascent possibly sung by the Levitical priests as they ascended the fifteen steps of the temple into the inner courtyard and / or by Israelite pilgrims processing to the temple in Jerusalem for annual feasts and festivals. These three Psalms praise the LORD for His protection of His people from their enemies, His unchanging faithfulness to His people, and His promise to restore and bless His people in the sight of the nations. Compare to Deut 31:6;

Joshua 1:9; Matthew 28:20; Romans 8:38-39

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Tuesday, June 12, 2018: Psalms 127-130

Psalms 127 and 128 proclaim that those whom have the LORD as their foundation will bear His fruits, particularly the blessed fruit of children. Works that proceed from any other foundation are fruitless and in vain. Psalms 129 and 130 are the hopeful confession of the faithful that the LORD will deliver from affliction and will redeem and restore according to His Word of promise.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Wednesday, June 13, 2018: 2 Samuel 1-2

Though Saul had pursued David seeking to kill him, David confessed Saul to be the LORD’s anointed king and loved and honored him. David does not rejoice at the news of Saul’s suicide, assisted by the Amalekite soldier. Though Saul asked the Amalekite to take his life, David knew that this was an act of murder and a transgression of the LORD’s commandments. The murder of Saul was a transgression against the LORD’s anointed king and against the LORD Himself. Jesus is the LORD’s anointed King as well, whom King Saul, even in his imperfection, typified and pointed to. Man’s fallen and corrupted reason is easily influenced by the devil to justify sins against God and His commandments. All life is a sacred gift from God. The LORD gives only government and rulers the authority to take human life in order to punish evildoers.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Thursday, June 14, 2018: 2 Samuel 3-4

The LORD desires mercy and not sacrifice. To show love, mercy, and forgiveness to the loveless, the merciless, and the unforgiving is the heart and “New Commandment” of the Lord. Though Abner had been his enemy, David showed him mercy and forgave him. In this and many other ways David showed himself to be a man after God’s own heart.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Friday, June 15, 2018: Psalms 6, 8-10

Psalm 6 – David takes his own sins and failings extremely seriously. Like Martin Luther, David experienced anfechtung, or great despair, at the consequences of his failure to meet the demands of God’s holy Law. Yet, David is comforted, as was Luther and us today, that the LORD has heard and accepted our prayer. Through faith in Jesus Christ, our sins, which are many, are forgiven and our lives are redeemed. Compare to Isaiah 1:18.

Psalms 9 and 10 are most likely one psalm that became divided into two. “The LORD is a stronghold for the oppressed, a stronghold in times trouble” for those who trust in Him. The enemies of the LORD and His people will become ensnared in their own evil works and be of remembrance no longer when the LORD delivers His faithful.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Saturday, June 16, 2018: Psalms 14, 16, 19, 21

Psalms 14, 19, and 21: These three psalms illustrate the depths of sinful man’s depravity in contrast to the greatness of Jesus’ redemption. The LORD’s existence, power, and might are undeniable. The works of His creation testify (Natural Revelation) of Him so that one denies the LORD against his own conscience. Compare to Romans 1:20.

Psalm 16:

This psalm praises the LORD for all manner of worldly and spiritual blessings. However, the climax of the psalm is a bold and hopeful confession of faith in the resurrection of the body akin to Job’s confession (Job 19:25). Verse 10 is a Messianic prophecy fulfilled in Jesus, God’s “holy one” whose body saw no corruption.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Monday, June 18, 2018: 1 Chronicles 1-2

Biblical genealogies are often passed over as mere historical information having no theological or doctrinal import. However, what we see in the genealogies of 1 Chronicles is God’s unfolding plan of salvation from Adam through Abraham through Jacob through Judah to David and, ultimately, to Jesus the Son of David and the Son of God. Our God is the LORD of history. He works through, guides, and directs all things according to His gracious wisdom and plan. Compare to the genealogies of Jesus provided in Matthew chapter 1 and Luke chapter 3 which include both Jews and Gentiles and even infamous sinners like Rahab the prostitute.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Tuesday, June 19, 2018: Psalms 43-45, 49

Psalm 43 and 44 – These psalms wrestle with the truth that God permits suffering to befall His children even as He promises to be with them and to deliver them. Faith, hope, and love are the gifts of the LORD that sustain us in affliction and preserve us through life and death into life that never ends. Compare to Psalm 23 in which the “Valley of the Shadow of Death” is our natural life and experiences.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Wednesday, June 20, 2018: Psalms 84-85, 87

Psalms 84 and 85: Worship in the Lord’s House is seen as a source and place of great refreshment, comfort, and protection. In the Lord’s House God’s people confess their sins and are absolved, saved, restored, and equipped for their God-given vocations. The Church is not a memorial for saints, but a hospital for sinners.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Thursday, June 21, 2018: 1 Chronicles 3-4

David’s dynasty ruled all of Israel for eighty years and the Southern Kingdom for over 400 years. In this genealogy we see how God raised up the lowly shepherd boy and made of him a father of kings and a great nation. From David’s line would come the Great King and Good Shepherd Jesus, the Savior of the Nations.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Friday, June 22, 2018: 1 Chronicles 5, Psalm 73

Psalm 73: The faithful have always wondered and asked, whether silently or aloud, “Why do the wicked prosper while the faithful struggle and perish?” This psalm addresses the doubt and envy the faithful struggle to resist directly. While an answer is not given, contentment and peace are found in “the sanctuary of God” where the faithful receive the one thing needful, the Word of the LORD, which cannot be moved and will never pass away. Compare to Ephesians 6:10-18. How does God equip us with “spiritual armor” through Word and Sacrament in the Divine Service?

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Saturday, June 23, 2018: Psalms 77-78

Psalm 78: The LORD’s deliverance of Israel out of bondage in Egypt through the Red Sea and into the Promised Land of Canaan is, perhaps, the central story of the Holy Scriptures. Numerous Psalms and teachings of Jesus and the Apostles reference this mighty work of the LORD and the people’s cyclic forgetting, being disciplined by God, repenting, and restoration. This, the second longest psalm, recounts once again how man’s heart grows cold and lazy as time passes. It is imperative that the faithful tell the coming generation of the glorious deeds of the LORD and His might and the wonders that He has done.”

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Monday, June 25, 2018: 1 Chronicles 6

1 Chronicles 6 – This portion of Chronicles’ genealogy names the priestly descendants of Levi. The significantly greater space allotted to the descendants of Levi highlights the importance of the priestly tribe and their service in the tabernacle and temple. “The Chronicler’s interest in the proper worship and ministry of ancient Israel is not merely one of order and regulation. It reflects desire for God’s grace found in the means that God has chosen.”

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Tuesday, June 26, 2018: Psalms 81, 88

Psalm 81 describes a time in which God’s people are comfortable and worship in peace, and yet, they have become complacent and have stopped listening to the LORD’s Word and have gone their own way. Reflect upon the words of the Prophet Isaiah 29:13 quoted by Jesus in Matthew 15:8-9 in relation to worship in the Church today. Psalm 88 is a psalm of great distress. Pray this psalm imagining Jesus praying to His Father in heaven. Praying the Psalms in persona Christi (in the person of Christ) often opens upon greater meaning and understanding.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Wednesday, June 27, 2018: Psalms 92-93

Psalm 92: “It is good to give thanks to the LORD.” It is good to worship the LORD. This is a First Commandment reality. When we fear, love, and trust in God above all things, we are in a right relationship with Him and may receive His blessings, contentment, and peace.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Thursday, June 28, 2018: 1 Chronicles 7-8

These chapters continue the genealogies of the Tribes of Israel. Though some tribes are numerically large and are described as mighty warriors, they were small in terms of faithfulness to the LORD and His Word. Nevertheless, the LORD is faithful in His promise to them. The small tribe of Benjamin is included, and from Benjamin will come Israel’s first king Saul.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Friday, June 29, 2018: 1 Chronicles 9-10

Chapter 9 records the return to Jerusalem after the Babylonian exile of the priests, Levites, gate keepers, and others associated with the care and service of the temple. The first thing to be restored was worship of the LORD, the prayers, and the sacrifices. Chapter 10 recounts Saul’s defeat and suicide. In these two chapters we see a contrast between centrality and faithfulness to the LORD and His Word (the restoration of the temple) and faithlessness (in Saul’s consultation with a medium and consequent defeat and suicide).

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Saturday, June 30, 2018: 2 Samuel 5:1-10

David is anointed king over all of Israel and, after conquering the Jebusites, establishes his capital in Jerusalem. The “Mountain of the LORD,” the same Mount upon which Isaac was spared at the command of an angel and a ram was sacrificed in his place, will become the temple mount upon which sacrifices will be offered to atone for the sins of the people and upon which Jesus, the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world, will offer Himself as the final and satisfactory sacrifice for the sins of all people. David’s men entered Jerusalem through the “water shaft,” perhaps an allusion to Holy Baptism.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Monday, July 2, 2018: 1 Chronicles 11-12

These chapters record the anointing and coronation of King David in accordance with the Word of the LORD by Samuel. Detrimental aspects of David’s character are omitted, but the LORD’s promise through David is highlighted. Under David’s kingship all of Israel will become united. The LORD is the Lord of history and He works all things in accordance with His good, holy, and perfect will and purpose.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Tuesday, July 3, 2018: Psalm 133

Unity is a blessing of the LORD in our families, in our communities, and in the Church. Such unity reflects the unity of the Godhead, the Holy Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Compare this psalm to Jesus’ High-Priestly Prayer in John 17:11.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Wednesday, July 4, 2018: Psalms 106-107

Psalm 106 is a psalm of praise for the mighty works of the LORD, and a psalm of confession by His people for their sinful rebellion and faithlessness. Psalm 107 is a psalm of praise for the LORD’s faithfulness and gracious restoration of His people who repent of their sins and cry to Him for mercy.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Thursday, July 5, 2018: 2 Samuel 5:11-6:23

The LORD is perfectly good and holy. He desires to bless and to be a blessing, but His holiness and righteousness demand perfect holiness from all. The command to not touch and so desecrate the Ark of the Covenant remained in force, even if someone were to touch it in order to preserve and to protect it. However, when the LORD’s commandments are kept, the blessing of the LORD is bestowed. How does the account of Uzzah in 2 Samuel 6:6 demonstrate our need for a mediator before God and our need for Jesus?

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Friday, July 6, 2018: 1 Chronicles 13-14

King David’s reign is established and blessed by God. The Gentile king of Tyre builds David’s house. David is blessed with many children. David is given victory over his enemies. We must never take the LORD and His blessings for granted or as the works of our own hands. “It is good to give thanks to the LORD” (Psalm 93).

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)


Saturday, July 7, 2018: 1 Chronicles 15-16

David brings the Ark of the Covenant to Jerusalem and there establishes the priestly care and worship before the presence of the LORD. Though the LORD anointed him king, David shows humble fear and love before the LORD by dressing in priestly garments. As a type or foreshadowing of Jesus, David was at once prophet, priest, and king.

—Jon Ellingworth (Christ the King, Pawling)